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  • John Nunno 9:45 am on October 17, 2014 Permalink
    Tags: , , ,   

    When it Comes to Interviews, Practice Makes Perfect 

    You submitted your application materials and secured an interview for a job or internship. Congrats! Now you need to nail the interview. How do you plan on prepping? Let me make a suggestion: start with InterviewStream! InterviewStream is the Career Center’s online mock interview resource you can use to video yourself and polish your interview skills.

    Follow these steps to get started:

    1) Create an account- Account set up takes approximately 14.9 seconds. All you need to provide is your name, email address, and a password (the password must be at least 6 characters and include a capital letter and a number). Create an account now!

    2) Select an interview to conduct- You can select either a pre-made interview created by the AU Career Center or make your own interview by selecting from thousands of questions InterviewStream provides. If you want to make your own, don’t be intimidated by the number of questions. You can search for questions by keyword or browse them by subject.

    3) Complete the interview- This step is straight forward enough- answer the questions! You need a computer with a webcam for the interview. If you do not have a webcam then please feel free to use an interview room at the Career Center. Call us at (202) 885-1804 to check availability.

    4) Review your interview- After you complete the interview it’s time to critique yourself. Click on “Watch My Interview” on the InterviewStream homepage and select the interview you want to review. Use the comment box to take notes on what you did well and what needs to be improved. You can track how many times you used common fillers like “Umm” and “You Know” by using the counter below the video.

    5) Share your interview- You can share your interview to get feedback from an advisor, mentor, or a friend. Click “Share” under the video and send the interview via email or generate a link to share.

    Using InterviewStream is that simple! You can practice for an interview you have coming up or just to keep your skills sharp. InterviewStream even has a mobile app so you can practice interviewing on the go.

    Click here to learn about the other online resources the Career Center has for you.

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  • Marie Spaulding 10:00 am on October 13, 2014 Permalink  

    Take a course for FREE on the AU Campus 

    Have you ever read a job description where the employer asked for skills using SPSS? What about qualifications with Python? How about ArcGIS?

    What do you do if you do not have these skills?

    Did you know that you can take courses in all three of these areas, and many more, at no cost through the Center for Teaching, Research and Learning (CTRL)? The CTRL Lab is in Hurst Hall, Room 202 – they offer courses Mon – Saturday. If you would like to register simply go to http://www.american.edu/ctrl/rsg.

     
  • Marie Spaulding 5:30 pm on October 8, 2014 Permalink  

    Looking for part-time employment? 

    Whether you are looking for a job on or off campus, it can be challenging to find part-time work. Here are some tips:

    • Take the time to Prepare your application materials
    • Apply by submitting your resume and a cover letter targeted to each specific employer and
    • Follow Up by emailing or calling the person who is reviewing the application materials.

    Make an appointment to meet with your Career Advisor who can help you to develop, or fine-tune, your resume and cover letter. You can also drop by the Career Center and meet with a Peer Advisor in the Career Center Library.

    (More …)

     
  • emily 4:15 pm on October 6, 2014 Permalink
    Tags: , ,   

    5 Tips to Nail an Interview Presentation 

    You have made it through the first and possibly even the second round of interviews for a job or internship. Congrats! Now you are asked to give a presentation in front of your possible future employers and colleagues. Regardless of your comfort-level speaking in front of groups, here are some important tips to a smooth, professional, and confident presentation.

    1)      Know yourself. You are going to be standing in front of a group of people, so all eyes will be on you. To be your most professional self, it is key to understand how you react to this sort of attention. Do you get very flushed? Wear a shirt with a high neck or collar. You will most likely already be wearing a jacket or blazer, so not to worry about getting warm, the extra layer should cover that. If you tend to fidget during a presentation, make sure you are not wearing rings or a watch/bracelet. Plan to keep you hair away from your face if you have a habit of touching it when nervous. Understanding yourself and how you react will allow you to plan ahead of time to make sure you look smooth and confident. That way you will have an easier time forgetting your nervous habits.

    2)      Know your topic. You will get questions after your presentation. Be prepared to answer them by understanding what you chose as a topic and why. The presentation is an opportunity for the employer to get to know you and how you prepare for assignments, so make sure you have spent enough time picking a great topic and creating a clear presentation with a beginning, middle, and conclusion.

    3)      Practice. Index cards or notes should contain only the briefest outline of your presentation, the rest should be memorized. You are telling the story, making your case, or sharing the facts, the slide is just a visual aid for the information you are providing. Practice the presentation as you will give it, so if you intend to move around and use hand gestures, rehearse them. If you tend to pace or shift, practice standing in one spot.

    4)      Have a backup plan. Technology is notorious for failing at the last minute. So bring at least one backup copy of your presentation on a USB, even if you sent the employer a copy ahead of time. In case of total technology meltdowns, bring paper copies of your notes or index cards.

    5)      Visit the Career Center. From discussing possible topics to practicing in front of others, the Career Center advisors are here to help. You can also reserve a room in the Career Center to record yourself giving the presentation so that you can watch and improve your speed, gestures, and content.

    Each interview and presentation is another opportunity to improve your speaking skills and will help you get one step closer to the right job or internship.

     

     
  • Anna Litman 9:56 pm on September 29, 2014 Permalink  

    Anna’s Pondering Question of the Week Series: choosing the focus of your studies 

    During my student appointments this past week, the most popular question was about choosing majors, asked mostly by sophomores. I was very excited to see them coming to me with this question at the beginning of the fall semester. The students will still have time to act on my advice and hopefully become more confident about their choice of a major, second major, or minor. So, I would like to ponder now the importance of time and timeliness with regard to choosing the focus of your studies.

    Most AU sophomores have a very busy life getting their course assignments done, attending to their jobs and internships, doing extracurricular activities, sports, and of course, having a social life. It’s easy to postpone making decisions when deadlines are still far away. For some undecided sophomores, the deadline for declaring a major at the end of their spring semester may seem to be still comfortably far away at this point. However, postponing this decision may cause you unnecessary stress and disappointment. To avoid that, take steps towards making this decision during your fall semester; don’t leave that to the months of March or April of 2015. If you want to be happy, satisfied and confident with your choice, you need to do a good deal of researching and reflecting, and then maybe researching and reflecting more and again. You do need time!

    In a nutshell, my advice about selecting a major is to use a rational approach that you would use to make any decision. Gather information, evaluate it to compare pros and cons, make your choice, and come up with an action plan. Start with gathering information about yourself: your interests, skills, talents, and abilities, personality preferences, and work related values. Don’t cut corners, do spend time reflecting on your own preferences: go deep, do self-assessments.

    Gaining a better understanding of yourself will help you in your next two steps: gathering information about major requirements and possible careers/jobs associated with those majors and evaluating this information. Meet with academic advisors; talk to faculty; read on-line and print information on different fields, careers, majors; attend on-campus career panels and other events; pick the brains of your friends and family, etc. Your career advisors will be happy to help you with this process by providing resources and guidance in self-exploration and career research, answering your questions, addressing your concerns, and serving as a sounding board for your ideas. However, YOU need to make the first step: schedule an appointment NOW, don’t wait until spring semester!

     
  • Jennifer Carignan 4:56 pm on September 25, 2014 Permalink
    Tags: , improv, teamwork   

    Article: “10 unexpected career lessons I learned from improv” 

    A career article on Idealist caught my attention today, and I thought I’d share it with you here on our advisor blog. In “10 unexpected career lessons I learned from improv”, author Lawrese Brown reflects on the transferability of skills and experiences from her beginner-level improv course to her day-to-day work. As a former student and performer of improv, this article resonated with me, as I see the practical benefits of my improv training every day, particularly as it relates to working in team settings, actively listening to students and colleagues, responding to unexpected events, and taking risks.

    Career and skill development can happen in many ways, and this article shows how a fun activity can have a broader impact on someone. What are some other fun ways you might develop skills to advance your career?

     
  • Jennifer Carignan 12:37 pm on September 25, 2014 Permalink
    Tags: , lsat, test prep   

    Career Center resources for LSAT prep 

    Regular self-study is an important part of preparing for the LSAT. But if you’ve done some research on LSAT prep books, you probably know that they can be quite expensive. Let the Career Center help! We welcome students and alumni to use the following LSAT study resources available in the Career Center library:

    (More …)

     
  • Anna Litman 7:30 pm on September 15, 2014 Permalink
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    Anna’s Pondering- the-Question- of- the-Week Series: be strategic about your job search. 

    Greetings all! I am resuming my blog series that I started in spring 2014. I will try to blog at least every other week to comment on the most typical, interesting, or challenging question that I have heard from CAS students during appointments. Of course, I won’t give out any names or specifics.

    The topic of this blog is particularly relevant for seniors. Since the beginning of the fall semester, I have met with several seniors graduating in May 2015 who are anxious to start looking for a job. However, they are not sure whether it’s too early, and their efforts will be a waste of time since most employers don’t hire for May 2015 in September 2014. Won’t it be better to live in the moment, enjoy the last college year, and focus on the job search closer to graduation? In my view, if you want to start a job right after or close to your graduation, you do need to start your job search early, as early as NOW, but do it in a smart way.  (More …)

     
  • John Nunno 5:45 pm on September 15, 2014 Permalink
    Tags: , Going Global, ,   

    Going Global: The Online Resource that Keeps on Giving 

    Going Global

    Access Going Global

    You can use Going Global to search for international work opportunities. You can use it to research the cost of living in specific countries. You can even use it to discover ways to act like a local (Did you know that when you are in Norway you are supposed to eat sandwiches with utensils? The more you know…) Why stop there? Did you know Going Global is a great resource if you are looking for opportunities in the US? There are US city guides including NYC, San Francisco, Chicago, and Seattle.

    What can you find in each guide, you ask? Here are a few examples:

    City specific job search resources- For example, if you are looking for opportunities in San Francisco, Going Global suggests checking out BAJobs.com and Bayjobs.com; both are websites that list opportunities in the San Francisco Bay area.

    Industry and Employment Trends- Going Global’s city guides give a general employment outlook along with industry specific information. You can use this information to target US cities that have job opportunities related to your career path.

    Professional and Social Networking Groups- You can find industry specific groups and general networking groups in the city guides. Industries include Accounting/Finance, IT, Engineering, Sales/Marketing, and others.

    Check out Going Global on the AU CareerWeb to access these career resources. Get started at http://www.american.edu/aucareerweb !

     

     
  • Sue Gordon 9:00 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink  

    It’s OK to Explore Majors! 

    confused person“I was certain I wanted to study International Relations, but now I realize that it’s just not for me. The problem is, now I don’t know what I want to do.” As the semester progresses, many students are looking up from their texts and realizing they do not want to pursue the path they had chosen.  Other students entered college with an eye to exploring majors. In either situation, it is critical for the student to know that being curious and open about their major is totally OK; after all, more than 60% of college students nationwide change their major at least once!   At AU, we are committed to help our students to find a major that is fulfilling and will lead to a great career. (More …)

     
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