Careers for Computational Science and Physics Majors

This week’s CAS Careers post provides career planning resources for Computational Science, and Physics majors. After the break, you’ll find some brief information on what you can do with your major after graduation, along with statistics on salary ranges and links to other helpful resources.

Careers in Computational Science

By studying in the Computational Science program at American University, you’re gaining practical experience that will prepare you for a range of technical computing careers. Specific skills you offer to potential employers include:

  • The ability to communicate mathematical concepts and data to diverse audiences
  • Experience analyzing problems and designing technical solutions using computing technology
  • Comfort adapting to new and changing technology
  • Experience developing client-specific systems for processing data
  • The ability to design and code computer programs
  • Proficiency in multiple programming languages

 

Here is a brief list of some popular careers in Computational Science, along with their national median salary*:

Electronics Engineer

$61,000

Actuary

$58,200

IT Project Engineer

$72,500

Mainframe Programmer

$47,500

Web Designer

$62,200

Applications Systems Analyst

$54,200

*Data collected from salary.com

 

Visit our Career Resource Library and check out some of our books on careers in Computational Science:

 

Here are a few websites with information on careers in Computational Science:

For a full list of relevant websites, other career options, and books in our Career Resource Library related to Computational Science, visit this site.

 

If you’re a Computational Science major, and would like some more personalized information on your career options, schedule an appointment with CAS Career Advisor Sue Gordon. Also, feel free to stop by our CAS drop-in hours, which are held every Tuesday from 1:30-2:30 next to the entrance to TDR.

 

Careers in Physics

Your degree in Physics from American University enables you to understand and effectively communicate complex scientific concepts—a skill highly prized among a wide range of fields and professions. The specific knowledge you gain of mathematical formulas, scientific tools/instruments, and software systems also give you a competitive edge in the job market. Other skills you offer to potential employers include:

  • Knowledge of physics’ ability to improve industrial processes
  • The ability to design software systems to process research data
  • Experience working with mathematical formulas, diagrams, and charts
  • The ability to think critically about applications in physics, agriculture, mining, medicine, and space exploration

Here is a brief list of some popular careers Physics majors have found success in, along with their national median salary*:

Test Engineer

$58,800

Physicist (Entry Level)

$57,300

Architect (Entry Level)

$42,100

Technical Writer (Entry Level)

$46,200

*Data collected from payscale.com and salary.com

 

Visit our Career Resource Library and check out some of our books on careers in Physics:

 

Here are a few websites with information on careers in Physics:

For a full list of relevant websites, other career options, and books in our Career Resource Library related to Physics, visit this site.

 

If you’re a Physics major, and would like some more personalized information on your career options, schedule an appointment with CAS Career Advisor Sue Gordon. Also, feel free to stop by our CAS drop-in hours, which are held every Tuesday from 1:30-2:30 next to the entrance to TDR.

 

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