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  • Anna Litman 9:43 pm on February 23, 2017 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , careers, , Health Studies, ,   

    Health Studies Career Night, February 15 2017 

    Prepared by Alexandra Jones, CAS Career Advising Team Assistant

    Did you miss the Health Studies Career Night, but are still interested in the information provided? Well, although you did miss the opportunity to directly communicate and network with professionals working in what may be your future career field, this blog post may help you.

    The panel, moderated by Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Studies (DHS) Kathleen Holton, and co-hosted by DHS and AU Career Center, consisted of four alumni:

    • Annika Bergstrom, TB Investigator at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    • Ryan Paquin, Research Scientist at the Center for Communication Science at RTI International
    • Elizabeth Prevou, Clinical Practice Manager at GWU, and
    • Justin Morgan, Research Assistant at the Health Policy Center at the Urban Institute.

    Each speaker talked about the most and least favorite aspects of their careers, as well as gave advice to aid students’ future success, which is shared below.

    How do you get your foot in the door?

    There are various ways to go about entering a career in the health field. While Bergstrom simply applied through USA Jobs, this may be difficult as it is a competitive process, in which your resume has to stand out to employers from hundreds of others. Other panelists recommend that students work their networks to obtain a job lead, or get connected to someone from the organization you are interested in.

    At times, your personality may be enough to get your foot in the door; the issue is displaying your character to employers. Morgan managed to get an interview with the Urban Institute by calling the institution and talking to an executive. This allowed him to add a personal touch to the application process, which cannot always be included in a resume submission.

    How to be strategic with your internships?

    Panelists recommend that students complete internships and treat each internship as a learning experience and utilize all connections gained.  Internships can also clarify your career goals and preferences. Prevou said, “Knowing what you don’t want to do at times is just as helpful as knowing what you do want to do.” At the same time, all panelists agreed that students should not jeopardize their peace of mind and sleep to work multiple internships at one time just to buff up a resume.

    What skills make students valuable and wanted in the workplace?

    No matter your desired job, all panelists recommended that students obtain basic research skills and knowledge of statistical programs, such as SAS, SPSS and Excel. AU offers courses and access to some of these programs through the Center for Teaching, Research and Learning (CTRL) if you have not learned them already.

    Knowledge of medical terms and anatomy also allows easy communication across job fields. While this may not be stressed in the interview, such knowledge may be necessary to learn on the job – so why not pick it up sooner rather than later?

    Lastly, knowing email etiquette and how to follow-up may be the most beneficial and necessary job skill in any field. Email are often the first form of communication between an employer and employee. Therefore learn how to make your emails sound professional and friendly, but with a hint of your personality.

    Were you prepared for the workplace post-graduation?

    While there will always be a learning curve when entering a new job, panelists stressed that students should not be nervous about it. After all, they did hire you! Still, be ready to put in the necessary effort to grow in your career. Listen, ask questions and do your best.

     

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  • John Nunno 4:14 pm on March 19, 2015 Permalink
    Tags: , , careers,   

    Get a Second Chance on these Career Center Library Books of the Week 

    There are over 20 million books written on career related topics. Okay I made that number up, but when you are browsing Amazon it does feel that way. The Career Center does not have 20 million books (it’s more like 400), but the books it does span a wide range of career topics. You can find anything from how to write a cover letter to how to use social media to find jobs. To help you navigate the jungle of career related books, each week the Career Center highlights a “Book of the Week” from its own library.

    Here’s the recap of the Career Center Library’s Book of the Week from the fall semester. Remember, any of these books can be checked out from the Career Center for seven days and renewed for an additional seven. Click the link to the library record to learn more about the book!

    10 Things Employers Want You to Learn in College by Bill Coplin

    The Start-Up of You  by Reid Hoffman (Cofounder of LinkedIn) and Ben Casnocha

    The Defining Decade by Meg Jay

    College Majors Handbook with Real Career Paths  by Neeta Fogg

    The Pathfinder: How to Choose or Change Your Career  by Nicholas Lore

    Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg (Chief Operating Officer of Facebook)

    Mrs. Moneypenny’s Career Advice for Ambitious Women  by Mrs. Moneypenny with Heather McGregor

    Women Lead: Career Perspectives from Workplace Leaders  edited by Tracey Wilen-Daugenti, Courtney Vien, and Caroline Molina-Ray

    Social Networking for Career Success  by Miriam Salpeter

    101 Great Answers to the Toughest Interview Questions  by Ron Fry

    Who’s Got Your Back?  by Keith Ferrazzi

    Power Verbs for Job Seekers  by Michael Lawrence Faulkner and Michelle Faulkner- Lunsford

    I’m in a Job Search, Now What? by Kristen Jacoway

    If you have any career-related books you would like to see added to the Career Center Library then send your suggestion to JNunno@american.edu. Follow the Career Center on Twitter (@AUCareerCenter) to see the latest Book of the Week as well as Career Center events and career advice!

     
  • John Charles 4:05 pm on March 24, 2014 Permalink
    Tags: APSIA, careers, , INGO, international development, , NGO, Peace Corps   

    Are you wondering what it takes to land a job and start a career with an international organization? Recently Hazel Douglas of Oxford HR presented on this topic in a webinar for the Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs (APSIA).

    While most of her comments were directed toward candidates who have several years of experience, she did have advice for people who are starting off their careers in international development.

    Entry-level position ideas:
    –Peace Corps is most obvious
    –Do travel/volunteer work
    –Pursue desk officer/administrator or fundraising/finance positions first, then pursue overseas positions within the company.

    What Ms. Douglas looks for in a candidate:
    –skills/experience set out in the job description, or a near match
    –concise, grammatical, properly spelled applicatoin.

    • Don’t apply on the closing date–sometimes 80-90 apps come in then. Apply as early as you can.

    Q: Should I move to Africa to improve my chances of landing a job?
    A: No, though you should have experience there if applying to organizations doing work there.

    TRENDS
    Steep increase in number of jobs that are trade-based supporting the economic structure. Experience in the commercial sector and entrepreneurial skills are important.

    Resources:

    websites: Charity Village, Devex, ReliefWeb, OpportunityNOCS
    indevjobs, Yellow Monday (Sussex U Institute of Development Studies)

    BOND (British Org of NGOS in Development)

     
  • Anna Litman 2:51 pm on October 17, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: , , careers, majors, , self-assessment   

    Anna’s Pondering The Question of the Week Series: Part I 

    The leaves are turning gold, rainy days are becoming more frequent, the demand for ice drinks is going down, and the students’ interest in career- related issues is going up. In my Fall blog series that I am embarking on now with my best intentions to post weekly, I would like to reflect on the students’ most typical question that I had to handle at the appointments last week. I hope this will help those who may have similar questions but haven’t yet had a chance to visit the Career Center.
    And the winning question of the week….DRUM ROLL!… is the question about selecting a major. If this is not your question, skip the rest of the blog, but do check my next week post! (More …)

     
  • Taylor Roosevelt 6:40 pm on September 28, 2012 Permalink
    Tags: , , , careers, , , , ,   

    GoingGlobal: A New Career Resource 

    Going Global image

    Click here to login to AUCareerWeb and access Going Global

    Need help identifying work options, both at home and abroad?
    Think Going Global: Your comprehensive ‘one stop’ career resource

    The American University Career Center is proud to announce access to Going Global, the leading provider of career and employment resources for evaluating, selecting and transitioning into a successful career in a foreign country. Boasting more than one million individual users, Going Global is used around the world by university career centers, educational and institutional organizations, libraries, corporate HR departments, and government agencies. (More …)

     
  • Taylor Roosevelt 1:37 pm on May 4, 2012 Permalink
    Tags: careers, , , , , WGSS   

    Careers for WGSS, Language & Area Studies, and Foreign Language and Communication Media Majors 

    This week’s CAS Careers post provides career planning resources for students majoring in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (WGSS), Language and Area Studies, and Foreign Language & Communication Media. After the break, you’ll find some brief information on what you can do with your major after graduation, along with statistics on salary ranges and links to other helpful resources. (More …)

     
  • Taylor Roosevelt 2:56 pm on April 3, 2012 Permalink
    Tags: careers, , , physics   

    Careers for Computational Science and Physics Majors 

    This week’s CAS Careers post provides career planning resources for Computational Science, and Physics majors. After the break, you’ll find some brief information on what you can do with your major after graduation, along with statistics on salary ranges and links to other helpful resources.

    Careers in Computational Science

    By studying in the Computational Science program at American University, you’re gaining practical experience that will prepare you for a range of technical computing careers. Specific skills you offer to potential employers include:

    • The ability to communicate mathematical concepts and data to diverse audiences
    • Experience analyzing problems and designing technical solutions using computing technology
    • Comfort adapting to new and changing technology
    • Experience developing client-specific systems for processing data
    • The ability to design and code computer programs
    • Proficiency in multiple programming languages

     

    Here is a brief list of some popular careers in Computational Science, along with their national median salary*:

    Electronics Engineer

    $61,000

    Actuary

    $58,200

    IT Project Engineer

    $72,500

    Mainframe Programmer

    $47,500

    Web Designer

    $62,200

    Applications Systems Analyst

    $54,200

    *Data collected from salary.com

     

    Visit our Career Resource Library and check out some of our books on careers in Computational Science:

     

    Here are a few websites with information on careers in Computational Science:

    For a full list of relevant websites, other career options, and books in our Career Resource Library related to Computational Science, visit this site.

     

    If you’re a Computational Science major, and would like some more personalized information on your career options, schedule an appointment with CAS Career Advisor Sue Gordon. Also, feel free to stop by our CAS drop-in hours, which are held every Tuesday from 1:30-2:30 next to the entrance to TDR.

     

    Careers in Physics

    Your degree in Physics from American University enables you to understand and effectively communicate complex scientific concepts—a skill highly prized among a wide range of fields and professions. The specific knowledge you gain of mathematical formulas, scientific tools/instruments, and software systems also give you a competitive edge in the job market. Other skills you offer to potential employers include:

    • Knowledge of physics’ ability to improve industrial processes
    • The ability to design software systems to process research data
    • Experience working with mathematical formulas, diagrams, and charts
    • The ability to think critically about applications in physics, agriculture, mining, medicine, and space exploration

    Here is a brief list of some popular careers Physics majors have found success in, along with their national median salary*:

    Test Engineer

    $58,800

    Physicist (Entry Level)

    $57,300

    Architect (Entry Level)

    $42,100

    Technical Writer (Entry Level)

    $46,200

    *Data collected from payscale.com and salary.com

     

    Visit our Career Resource Library and check out some of our books on careers in Physics:

     

    Here are a few websites with information on careers in Physics:

    For a full list of relevant websites, other career options, and books in our Career Resource Library related to Physics, visit this site.

     

    If you’re a Physics major, and would like some more personalized information on your career options, schedule an appointment with CAS Career Advisor Sue Gordon. Also, feel free to stop by our CAS drop-in hours, which are held every Tuesday from 1:30-2:30 next to the entrance to TDR.

     

     
  • Taylor Roosevelt 8:00 pm on March 29, 2012 Permalink
    Tags: biochemistry, biology, careers, , chemistry, marine biology,   

    Careers for Chemistry, Biochemistry, Biology, and Marine Biology Majors 

    This week’s CAS Careers post provides career planning resources for students majoring in Chemistry, Biochemistry, Biology, and Marine Biology. After the break, you’ll find some brief information on what you can do with your major after graduation, along with statistics on salary ranges and links to other helpful resources. (More …)

     
  • Taylor Roosevelt 2:36 pm on February 13, 2012 Permalink
    Tags: , careers, , religious studies, sociology   

    Careers for Anthropology, Sociology, and Religious Studies Majors 

    This week’s CAS Careers post provides career planning resources for students majoring in Anthropology, Sociology, and Religious Studies. After the break, you’ll find some brief information on what you can do with your major after graduation, along with statistics on salary ranges and links to other helpful resources. (More …)

     
  • Taylor Roosevelt 2:28 pm on January 30, 2012 Permalink
    Tags: american studies, Audio Technology, careers,   

    Careers for American Studies Majors and Audio Technology/Production Majors 

     

    This week’s CAS Careers post provides career planning resources for American Studies majors and Audio Technology majors. After the break, you’ll find some brief information on what you can do with your major after graduation, along with statistics on salary ranges and links to other helpful resources.

    (More …)

     
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