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  • Anna Litman 9:55 pm on April 11, 2016 Permalink
    Tags: analytical reasoning, , , Job search,   

    ANALYZE THIS: PART I. TOP SKILL #4 IN THE EYES OF EMPLOYERS IS ANALYTICAL REASONING AND CRITICAL THINKING 

     

    According to the annual survey of the American Association of Colleges and Universities, one of the top skills sought by employers is a combination of critical thinking and analytical reasoning. Our own sample of 162 employers who attended the Job and Internship Fair in March 2016 has confirmed this finding: 89% of them were looking for candidates with this particular skill combination. These employers range from not-for-profits and businesses to government agencies and international organizations in various fields and industries.

    What do the employers mean by “analytical” and “critical thinking” skills? Why are these skills so much in demand? Do you possess these skills? If you do, how would you demonstrate that to your potential employer? What activities would help develop analytical reasoning and critical thinking?

    Find out this and more in my two part blog. (More …)

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  • emily 5:24 pm on March 24, 2015 Permalink
    Tags: , Job search,   

    Here’s My Card 

    Love it or hate it, there is almost no way to avoid it in DC. The business card. It’s a networking staple and an easy way to stay in contact with people. Having your own is a great way to show initiative and professionalism during your job or internship search.

    How to get started on creating one of your own:

    The essential information to include is your name, email, phone number, and your basic education information. Additional information, like your Twitter handle or other social media account, can be included, but be careful. If your social media account or blog is original and professional (articles, photos, videos, etc.) and you want to showcase your work, then go ahead. But if your accounts are full of selfies and cat videos, better to leave them off.

    For your education information you can include American University, your school, and your class year (ex. Class of 2015). An extra title that indicates your professional interest is a great addition as well, for example “Student Videographer”, “Future Educator”, or “Marketing Professional”.

    Today it is simpler than ever to create your very own business card. Here are some fast and cheap sources:

    DeLong Lithographics – Get the American University business card, logo and all. This is a fast way to get cards with easy instructions. It is also a good option if you want a professional card with the university’s logo front and center.

    UPS AU Campus Location – The UPS store on campus offer business card printing services that include templates with the AU logo.

    Vistaprint.com – Prices depend on paper quality and some additional fees, but prices start at $16 for 100 cards.

    Moo.com – Another online resource for business cards. Prices start at $19.99 for double-sided cards.

    This is an opportunity to be creative, have fun with creating a professional business card. Are there other resources for business cards that you have used? Share in the comments section below.

     
  • John Nunno 4:39 pm on February 3, 2015 Permalink
    Tags: , , H1B visa, , Job search   

    Target H1B Visa Employers with Going Global 

    Going Global

    Job searching in the US as an international student can be tough. To assist with the search, the Career Center subscribes to Going Global’s H1B visa employer database. Going Global’s H1B visa database lists companies that submitted H1B visa applications for specific metro areas (including DC!) and all 50 states. The data is updated quarterly from the US Department of Labor. The database is an extremely useful resource that can help you target employers with a history of submitting H1B visa applications. Please note that these listings are not job postings.

    There are two different ways to search for employers within the database:

    1) You can search for employers based on geography using “Metro Search” and “State Search”. Information for the DC area is found under the “Metro Search” category.

    2) You can search for employers by industry, job title, or company using the “H1B PLUS USA search”.

    To access Going Global, log in to your AU CareerWeb account and click “Going Global” under “Quicklinks”. The H1B database is found under the “H1B Info” tab. If you have any questions about the resource feel free to email me at JNunno@american.edu.

     
  • emily 7:14 pm on November 25, 2014 Permalink
    Tags: Job search, ,   

    Creating the Best Writing Sample 

    Food, family, and a study break-Thanksgiving is not too soon to think about job application writing samples. This may sound daunting, but hear me out.

    The best advice when it comes to writing samples is to get some ready now. Having a variety of samples makes it easier to quickly apply for a job or internship opportunity when it comes. The exact requirements and nature of the writing sample will depend on the field, job details, and the preference of the employer. A research position or a well-cited paper or lab report, a communications position could want a catchy blog piece, and a policy organization could want a concise article.

    To be ready for the writing sample request, take a moment to look at what you have written or are writing now. You do not have to re-create the wheel with each application. Students and recent graduates can use academic papers or other work from college. However, it is less encouraged for alumni further out from their degree to do the same.

    Most of the time the sample will be no longer than two pages, five max. Chances are the best writing you have done for class has been significantly longer than 2 pages. So, how to cut down your favorite work without losing what made it so good?

    First, identify the meat of the paper. Where did you defend your thesis or conclusion the strongest? Where did you really flex your analytical skills? The goal of a writing sample is to measure your ability to write professionally, clearly, and succinctly. Just sending the first two pages of a much longer paper may leave out too much and seem incomplete.

    Second, be ready to edit. Even if you do not yet know the specific organization or job that you will apply for, do some preliminary research. Look at the writing style of some different organizations that you are interested in to edit the sample accordingly. When you do apply, use the style and tone of that particular employer and have the sample address a topic, theme, or issue that you could be required to work on in the position.

    The key is having something ready in your back pocket, or saved on your computer, that you are proud to share with a potential employer. Thanksgiving break is a good time to pick out blogs, academic papers, news articles, or other projects from this or previous semesters. That way when finals hit and you are applying for jobs or internships you do not have to create an entirely new piece. Preparation and a little research now could save you some precious hours of sleep come December.

    For more on writing samples check out the Career Center website.

     
  • emily 4:15 pm on October 6, 2014 Permalink
    Tags: , , Job search   

    5 Tips to Nail an Interview Presentation 

    You have made it through the first and possibly even the second round of interviews for a job or internship. Congrats! Now you are asked to give a presentation in front of your possible future employers and colleagues. Regardless of your comfort-level speaking in front of groups, here are some important tips to a smooth, professional, and confident presentation.

    1)      Know yourself. You are going to be standing in front of a group of people, so all eyes will be on you. To be your most professional self, it is key to understand how you react to this sort of attention. Do you get very flushed? Wear a shirt with a high neck or collar. You will most likely already be wearing a jacket or blazer, so not to worry about getting warm, the extra layer should cover that. If you tend to fidget during a presentation, make sure you are not wearing rings or a watch/bracelet. Plan to keep you hair away from your face if you have a habit of touching it when nervous. Understanding yourself and how you react will allow you to plan ahead of time to make sure you look smooth and confident. That way you will have an easier time forgetting your nervous habits.

    2)      Know your topic. You will get questions after your presentation. Be prepared to answer them by understanding what you chose as a topic and why. The presentation is an opportunity for the employer to get to know you and how you prepare for assignments, so make sure you have spent enough time picking a great topic and creating a clear presentation with a beginning, middle, and conclusion.

    3)      Practice. Index cards or notes should contain only the briefest outline of your presentation, the rest should be memorized. You are telling the story, making your case, or sharing the facts, the slide is just a visual aid for the information you are providing. Practice the presentation as you will give it, so if you intend to move around and use hand gestures, rehearse them. If you tend to pace or shift, practice standing in one spot.

    4)      Have a backup plan. Technology is notorious for failing at the last minute. So bring at least one backup copy of your presentation on a USB, even if you sent the employer a copy ahead of time. In case of total technology meltdowns, bring paper copies of your notes or index cards.

    5)      Visit the Career Center. From discussing possible topics to practicing in front of others, the Career Center advisors are here to help. You can also reserve a room in the Career Center to record yourself giving the presentation so that you can watch and improve your speed, gestures, and content.

    Each interview and presentation is another opportunity to improve your speaking skills and will help you get one step closer to the right job or internship.

     

     
  • Anna Litman 7:30 pm on September 15, 2014 Permalink
    Tags: , Job search, ,   

    Anna’s Pondering- the-Question- of- the-Week Series: be strategic about your job search. 

    Greetings all! I am resuming my blog series that I started in spring 2014. I will try to blog at least every other week to comment on the most typical, interesting, or challenging question that I have heard from CAS students during appointments. Of course, I won’t give out any names or specifics.

    The topic of this blog is particularly relevant for seniors. Since the beginning of the fall semester, I have met with several seniors graduating in May 2015 who are anxious to start looking for a job. However, they are not sure whether it’s too early, and their efforts will be a waste of time since most employers don’t hire for May 2015 in September 2014. Won’t it be better to live in the moment, enjoy the last college year, and focus on the job search closer to graduation? In my view, if you want to start a job right after or close to your graduation, you do need to start your job search early, as early as NOW, but do it in a smart way.  (More …)

     
  • John Nunno 5:45 pm on September 15, 2014 Permalink
    Tags: , , Job search,   

    Going Global: The Online Resource that Keeps on Giving 

    Going Global

    Access Going Global

    You can use Going Global to search for international work opportunities. You can use it to research the cost of living in specific countries. You can even use it to discover ways to act like a local (Did you know that when you are in Norway you are supposed to eat sandwiches with utensils? The more you know…) Why stop there? Did you know Going Global is a great resource if you are looking for opportunities in the US? There are US city guides including NYC, San Francisco, Chicago, and Seattle.

    What can you find in each guide, you ask? Here are a few examples:

    City specific job search resourcesFor example, if you are looking for opportunities in San Francisco, Going Global suggests checking out BAJobs.com and Bayjobs.com; both are websites that list opportunities in the San Francisco Bay area.

    Industry and Employment Trends Going Global’s city guides give a general employment outlook along with industry specific information. You can use this information to target US cities that have job opportunities related to your career path.

    Professional and Social Networking Groups– You can find industry specific groups and general networking groups in the city guides. Industries include Accounting/Finance, IT, Engineering, Sales/Marketing, and others.

    Check out Going Global on the AU CareerWeb to access these career resources. Get started at http://www.american.edu/aucareerweb !

     

     
  • John Nunno 2:32 pm on August 18, 2014 Permalink
    Tags: , , Job search,   

    All about that Career Center Library 

    Are you looking for a place away from the hustle and bustle of your dorm so you can start your career search? If yes then the Career Center Library is the place for you!

    The Career Center Library is a quiet space within the Career Center, located on the 5th floor of Butler Pavilion. It has coffee and tea to fuel your job and internship search. You can use the library’s computers to research career options, work on resumes, and apply to positions. Need to print some career-related materials? Print up to ten pages here for free! And don’t forget our collection of career resources: over 450 books covering a wide range of career topics. Each book can be borrowed from the library for 7 days and renewed once (either online or in-person). Popular topics include Career Planning, Networking & Salary Negotiation, and Interviewing.

    During the fall and spring semesters you can find our wonderful staff of Peer Advisors in the Career Center Library. Peer Advisors review resumes and cover letters for undergraduates in SIS, SOC, SPA, and CAS. Stop by any time to meet with one.

    Come to the Career Center Library, enjoy a cup of coffee, and get started on your job or internship search!

    CC Lib pic

     
  • Jennifer Carignan 9:11 pm on April 3, 2014 Permalink
    Tags: , Job search, organizations   

    Uncovering new employers with Idealist 

    It is widely known that Idealist is far and away the best site for jobseekers interested in career opportunities in nonprofits. But did you know that Idealist also has one of the most comprehensive directories of nonprofits and social enterprise organizations on the web? This is a great resource to help you identify additional employers in your job search. Here’s how it works:

    (More …)

     
  • Taylor Roosevelt 5:07 pm on March 18, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: , Job search, , , Pinterest   

    Career Center Resources for Different Learning Styles 

    Are you a hands-on learner? Do you prefer lecture-style classes? Or perhaps group work is more your style. Regardless of the way you prefer to access and process information, the Career Center has a variety of resources to suit your preferences. Keep reading for more information on our resources for verbal, visual, interpersonal (social), and intrapersonal (solitary) learners.

    (More …)

     
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